ROYAL MAIL CELEBRATES THE WINDMILLS AND WATERMILLS OF THE UK WITH SPECIAL STAMPS

Posted on Wednesday 21st June, 2017 by

  • As a tribute to these iconic and endearing structures, Royal Mail will today issue a new set of Special Stamps featuring three windmills and three watermills from around the UK
  • The set is made up of stamps featuring: Nutley Windmill, East Sussex; New Abbey Corn Mill, Dumfries and Galloway; Ballycopeland Windmill, County Down, Northern Ireland; Cheddleton Flint Mill, Staffordshire; Woodchurch Windmill, near Ashford, Kent and Felin Cochwillan Mill, Gwynedd
  • Windmills were first referred to in east and south-east England in records dating from the 12th century, and had become widespread throughout Britain by the end of the 13th century
  • Watermills were introduced into Britain by the Romans in the 1st century AD
  • Some of the UK’s surviving windmills and watermills are over 400 years old and many are still in working order
  • For each of the stamps, Royal Mail will provide a special handstamp on all mail posted in a postbox closest to where the windmill or watermill is located. It will be applied for five days from 20 – 24 June, 2017
  • The new stamps are available from today at royalmail.com/windmills and 7,000 Post Offices across the UKWoodchurch Windmill, Kent
    Woodchurch Windmill is a traditional Kentish smock mill, formerly one of a pair. Such mills are typically found in areas where there is a strong tradition of timber building. The upper mill, which was used as an observation post in the First World War, was tarred black and the weatherboarding of the lower mill, which survives, is painted white. Dating from the early 19th century, the mill stopped work in 1926 and was fortunate to survive two decades of decay. The timber frame of the smock tower, which stands on a brick base, had distorted badly and the mill has subsequently been substantially rebuilt and restored to working order. It contains three pairs of millstones driven by four shuttered sails, a form patented in 1807. The sails and cap of the mill are turned to face the wind automatically by a fantail.

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